12
Aug 20

Tree planting in the neighbourhood

Green Councillor Ian Mutch points to some of the willow trees he planted on the Beckery two years ago.

There is a very promising development in the tree planting front here in Glastonbury as I discovered when I met up with Green Town Councillor Ian Mutch recently.

A number of flourishing Crack Willows (Salix fragilis) are to be found on the Sydenhams Timber yard side of the Mill Stream rivulet running alongside Beckery Road.

Cllr. Mutch planted the small seedlings over the past two years and they are growing magnificently in their new homes.

This is what is hoped to be the first of a large number of seedlings which will be planted in the Glastonbury and Street area over the next few years.

Cllr. Brian Outten

9
Aug 20

When we say ‘Never Again’, we mean it

“We must never forget – and pledge never again to inflict such mass destruction. That should start with the UK scrapping plans to replace and upgrade Trident, and instead sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.”
Caroline Lucas MP.


On Sunday 9th August, Glastonbury’s Mayor, Cllr. Jon Cousins and Deputy Mayor, Cllr. Sue Barnet, observed The Silent Minute at 11:02 a.m. to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Nagasaki atomic bomb.

A member of the international movement Mayors For Peace, Cllr. Cousins read a message from Mayor Taue of Nagasaki:

“Exactly 75 years have passed since the day our city was assaulted by a nuclear bomb. Despite the passing of three quarters of a century, we are still living in world where nuclear weapons exist.
I appeal to the leaders of countries around the world.  Please aim to break down the growing climate of distrust and instead build trust through dialogue... At this very time, please choose solidarity over division. At the NPT Review Conference, which is scheduled for next year, I ask that you show a workable way towards nuclear disarmament.”

“ ‘Only 100 seconds remain.’ In order to symbolize this state of crisis, the ‘Doomsday Clock’, an indicator of the time left until the earth’s extinction, was set at its shortest time ever this year.”

The observation took place at Glastonbury’s Peace Pole which was planted on 26th January 2013 by the Pilgrim Reception Centre supported by Uma Uchima, from the World Peace Prayer Society and Tatomir Ion-Marius, a Romanian Peace Ambassador and international peace worker.

Glastonbury’s Peace Pole has “May Peace Prevail on Earth” written on it in eight languages and also a Braille plate. Located on the grass verge at the front of St Dunstan’s car park in the centre of the town, it ensures visitors and residents all have the opportunity to see and feel the message.

3
Aug 20

Observing ‘The Silent Minute’ on the 75th Anniversary of Nagasaki

In light of the significant 75th anniversary in August of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan during the Second World War, Glastonbury’s Mayor and Deputy Mayor will observe a Silent Minute at 11:02 a.m. on Sunday, 9th August 2020* – remembering all victims of nuclear weapons.

Glastonbury’s Mayors are members of Mayors For Peace, an international body which came into being on 24th June 1982 at the second United Nations Special Session on Disarmament held in New York, when Takeshi Araki, the then Mayor of Hiroshima, called for cities throughout the world to transcend national borders and work together to press for nuclear abolition.

As Mayors for Peace, Glastonbury’s Mayor Cllr. Jon Cousins and Deputy Mayor Cllr. Sue Barnet call on the UK Government to support the 2017 United Nations Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), which is working towards the complete prohibition of developing, testing, and using nuclear weapons. At present, the UK Government has refused to sign or ratify the treaty, which has been signed by 81 members of the United Nations…

The observation of the Silent Minute will take place at Glastonbury’s ‘Peace Pole’, which is situated outside Glastonbury Information Centre, St. Dunstan’s House – at the entrance of the Magdalene Street Car Park.

Please note: If you wish to observe the Silent Minute in a public space, please respect social distancing rules.

The Silent Minute:
The Silent Minute was conceived by Glastonbury visionary, Major Wellesley Tudor Pole O.B.E. in 1940, during the Battle of Britain.

Tudor Pole’s vision was for people to unite in meditation, prayer, or focus (each according to their own belief) and consciously will for “peace to prevail”.

The concept of the dedicated Silent Minute received the direct support of King George VI, Sir Winston Churchill and his Parliamentary Cabinet. It was also recognized by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and observed on land and at sea on the battlefields, in air raid shelters, and in hospitals.

With Churchill’s support, the BBC, on Sunday, 10th November 1940, began to play the bells of Big Ben on the radio as a signal for The Silent Minute to begin.

The tradition of The Silent Minute continues to this day, and Glastonbury Council observe The Silent Minute at the beginning of each of our meetings.

Tudor Pole explained it’s meaning thus: “There is no power on earth that can withstand the united cooperation on spiritual levels of men and women of goodwill everywhere.”

The Original Silent Minute Flyer


* The anniversary of the time and date of the Nagasaki atom bomb, which instantly killed over 60,000 people at 11:02 a.m. on 9th August 1945, resulting in Japan’s unconditional surrender, effectively ending the Second World War.